{Whatever Wednesday}

Whatever Wednesday — a chance to post something I’ve seen that I’m diggin’. Though often a cool quote or poster, it might simply be a picture.

Enjoy!… and consider posting your own Whatever.


Any book that helps a child to form a habit of reading, to make reading one of his deep and continuing needs, is good for him. –Maya Angelou #reading #quote

Maya Angelou

Here’s a GREAT poem from Ms Angelou–Caged Bird”.


P.S.–Remember last week I shared Danielle and her signed copy of The One and Only Ivan? That’s now the signed Newbery Award-winning The One and Only Ivan.

Photo Jan 28, 11 58 02 AM

[I got to watch the announcement LIVE with my per 5-6 class.]

Congratulations, K. A. Applegate.

Congratulations, Danielle.

Photo Jan 22, 4 45 16 PM

Congratulations to us readers who get to enjoy this fabulous book.

How did this come about? I sent out a little Tweet:

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[Danielle was one of the 41 students who signed up to read IVAN after watching the trailer. She couldn’t wait to get a classroom copy. In fact, a few kids have gone out to purchase their own.]

Mrs. Applegate responded publicly…

Screen Shot 2013-01-22 at 8.58.37 PM

…then messages me later to ask if she could send Danielle a signed copy. I almost fell off my seat.

When Danielle opened the package, I took some pictures and sent one along to Mrs. A. She responded quickly:

Screen Shot 2013-01-22 at 8.56.07 PM

No, Mrs. Applegate. You made my day. And Danielle’s. And inspired the rest of the students who now see how kind and real authors are. You’ve made fans for life.

1.28 Ring-the-Bell Monday & It’s Monday! What are you reading?

A new week, a new batch of books–both books finished and being read. Today is…

Ring-the-Bell Monday & It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?

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{Sharing what books we’ve read in the past week & the titles we are currently reading.}

WHOA-WHOA-WHOA! First things first–

Today is the big day. The ALA Youth Media Awards will announce the big winners in youth literature.

This is the Academy Awards for materials for youth and teens. Here is the blurb from their site: 

Each year the American Library Association honors books, videos, and other outstanding materials for children and teens. Recognized worldwide for the high quality they represent, the ALA Youth Media Awards, including the prestigious Newbery, Caldecott, Printz, and Coretta Scott King Book Awards, guide parents, educators, librarians, and others in selecting the best materials for youth. Selected by committees composed of librarians and other literature and media experts, the awards encourage original and creative work in the field of children’s and young adult literature and media.

I will be watching them LIVE at 11:00 EST here.

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[OK–in the interest of full disclosure, I mostly finished this book. It was due back at the library before I I got all the way through. I made it about 3/4 through, though. Amazing stuff.]
[What would you do if everywhere you looked you saw visions of a horrific crash… at a location with which you were familiar… that was going to kill people you knew? Let’s face it–everyone would think you were loco en la cabeza if you said it aloud. And yet, you knew (maybe?) that it was going to happen. Top that off with a Romeo & Juliet/Hatfields & McCoys-type family feud that keeps a relationship apart, and you’ve got Crash: Visions–Book One by Lisa McMann. I’m ready for the next book. (PS–Due to some language, I would not recommend this to my 6th grade students.) ]
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§ § §
[Check back throughout the day for updates of my students’ reading.]
Since last Monday, my A Class has read:
10 books
My B Class has read:
13 books
My C Class has read:
9 books
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§     §     §
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{Thanks to Mr. Peterson for the logo.}
Still hoping for:
 

Parents and students: remember, the False Prince book order and $ is due tomorrow. We want to get the order in so we can receive the books and start reading! I’m looking forward to talking it over with you and Skyping with Ms Nielsen.

And I’d like to get my hands on
 

YALSA announces 2013 YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults finalists:

  • Bomb: The Race to Build – and Steal- the World’s Most Dangerous Weaponwritten by Steve Sheinkin, published by Flash Point/Roaring Brook Press, an imprint of Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group.

Cool interview with the author here (and you can hear him read a bit from the book).

Before you see what the students are reading… what are you reading? Please leave a comment and let us know—and show the students that reading isn’t just a “school” thing.

(For every parent who leaves a comment with what you’re reading, I’ll give your child a BUSTED ticket…)

[Check back at the end of the day to see the cool spinning pictures of what my students are reading.]

Click the picture below for A Class SpinCam
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Click the picture below for B Class SpinCam
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Click the picture below for C Class SpinCam
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Thanks,
David Etkin

1.25 {BookFlix Friday} Insignia

Today is

There are tons of great book trailers out in cyberland, and each Friday I will endeavor to bring a couple to you. Many will be new and recent books. Some trailers will preview a not-yet-released book. And others will look back a little further.

Lights…Camera…Action!


`

More than anything, Tom Raines wants to be important, though his shadowy life is anything but that. For years, Tom’s drifted from casino to casino with his unlucky gambler of a dad, gaming for their survival. Keeping a roof over their heads depends on a careful combination of skill, luck, con artistry, and staying invisible.

Then one day, Tom stops being invisible. Someone’s been watching his virtual-reality prowess, and he’s offered the incredible—a place at the Pentagonal Spire, an elite military academy. There, Tom’s instincts for combat will be put to the test and if he passes, he’ll become a member of the Intrasolar Forces, helping to lead his country to victory in World War III. Finally, he’ll be someone important: a superhuman war machine with the tech skills that every virtual-reality warrior dreams of. Life at the Spire holds everything that Tom’s always wanted—friends, the possibility of a girlfriend, and a life where his every action matters—but what will it cost him?

Gripping and provocative, S. J. Kincaid’s futuristic thrill ride of a debut crackles with memorable characters, tremendous wit, and a vision of the future that asks startling, timely questions about the melding of humanity and technology.

I haven’t read this book, but the description reminds me of

[click the book for a description.]

{Whatever Wednesday} a Signed IVAN

Whatever Wednesday — a chance to post something I’ve seen that I’m diggin’. Though often a cool quote or poster, it might simply be a picture.

Enjoy!… and consider posting your own Whatever.


Meet Danielle. Danielle received a special gift on Tuesday:

Photo Jan 22, 4 45 16 PM

How did this come about? I sent out a little Tweet:

Screen Shot 2013-01-22 at 8.58.28 PM

[Danielle was one of the 41 students who signed up to read IVAN after watching the trailer. She couldn’t wait to get a classroom copy. In fact, a few kids have gone out to purchase their own.]

Mrs. Applegate responded publicly…

Screen Shot 2013-01-22 at 8.58.37 PM

…then messages me later to ask if she could send Danielle a signed copy. I almost fell off my seat.

When Danielle opened the package, I took some pictures and sent one along to Mrs. A. She responded quickly:

Screen Shot 2013-01-22 at 8.56.07 PM

No, Mrs. Applegate. You made my day. And Danielle’s. And inspired the rest of the students who now see how kind and real authors are. You’ve made fans for life.

1.21 Ring-the-Bell Monday & It’s Monday! What are you reading?

A new week, a new batch of books–both books finished and being read. Today is…

Ring-the-Bell Monday & It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?

20120117-111701.jpg 20120819-185816.jpg

{Sharing what books we’ve read in the past week & the titles we are currently reading.}

20121202-215616.jpg

[This was awesome! So much came together at the end–some surprising, some slightly predictable, as it should be. Sage was a great character. Fun to read about, but I bet he’s be tough to teach. I’m curious to see what happens with some of the secondary characters as the series moves forward. Now I’m hoping that my ARC of Runaway King, the second book in this Ascendance Trilogy, gets approved on NetGalley. Keep your eyes open, kids… More to come!]
Last Thursday I posted THIS about False Prince:

False Prince feels like Royal Survivor: Outwit, Outplay, Outlast

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§ § §
[Check back throughout the day for updates of my students’ reading.]
Since last Monday, my A Class has read:
19 books
My B Class has read:
24 books
My C Class has read:
21 books
20121202-215626.jpg
 
[I wasn’t intending to read this next–I had intended on reading Amelia Lost–but I had requested this from the library and it came in. I’m the first to get it. I had to read it. It goes along well with Prisoner B-3087, which I read last month.]

In a stirring chronicle, Doreen Rappaport brings to light the courage of countless Jews who organized to sabotage the Nazis and help other Jews during the Holocaust.

Under the noses of the military, Georges Loinger smuggles thousands of children out of occupied France into Switzerland. In Belgium, three resisters ambush a train, allowing scores of Jews to flee from the cattle cars. In Poland, four brothers lead more than 1,200 ghetto refugees into the forest to build a guerilla force and self-sufficient village. And twelve-year-old Motele Shlayan entertains German officers with his violin moments before setting off a bomb. Through twenty-one meticulously researched accounts — some chronicled in book form for the first time — Doreen Rappaport illuminates the defiance of tens of thousands of Jews across eleven Nazi-occupied countries during World War II. In answer to the genocidal madness that was Hitler’s Holocaust, the only response they could abide was resistance, and their greatest weapons were courage, ingenuity, the will to survive, and the resolve to save others or to die trying.
Extensive end matter includes:
– timeline of important events
– index
– pronunciation guide
– source notes
– maps integrated throughout text

 
§ § §
[I didn’t intend to read this now–but it JUST came in at the library and I couldn’t help it. I’m not sure this is a 6th grade book, so I’m trying to read it quickly.]
§     §     §
Screen Shot 2013-01-15 at 9.39.48 PM
{Thanks to Mr. Peterson for the logo.}
 
[I can hope.]

Before you see what the students are reading… what are you reading? Please leave a comment and let us know—and show the students that reading isn’t just a “school” thing.

(For every parent who leaves a comment with what you’re reading, I’ll give your child a BUSTED ticket…)

[Check back at the end of the day to see the cool spinning pictures of what my students are reading.]

Click the picture below for A Class SpinCam
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Click the picture below for B Class SpinCam
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Click the picture below for C Class SpinCam
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Thanks,
David Etkin

Nerdy Book Club post

Today I am the guest blogger on the NERDY BOOK CLUB blog.

My topic?

WALL OF READING

If you know older music, that’s a reading take-off on Phil Spector’s Wall of Sound recording style. What? You have no idea what that means? Well go read it and find out.

What do you mean you haven’t heard of the Nerdy Book Club? C’mon, man! I’m talkin’ about the

That’s the blog that wan THIS award:

And was nominated for THIS award:

Did I mention that the Nerdy Book Club has its own line of Swag?

Large Mug

[Yup–thanks to a great colleague, I have that mug!]

This is actually my second Nerdy post–My friend and colleague Mr. Brent Peterson and I co-posted on the book Dead End in Norvelt last year.

Go read. Enjoy. Leave a comment!

1.18 {BookFlix Friday} Focus on Non-Fiction II

Today is

There are tons of great book trailers out in cyberland, and each Friday I will endeavor to bring a couple to you. Many will be new and recent books. Some trailers will preview a not-yet-released book. And others will look back a little further.

Lights…Camera…Action!


Time for some more NF [non-fiction] book trailers… or NF book-related videos. We read NF to find out about the fascinating world and people around us.

First, I’d like to highlight this trailer that one of my students, Amanda A., made for The Diary of a Young Girl.

Book Description

Release date: June 1, 1993
Discovered in the attic in which she spent the last years of her life, Anne Frank’s remarkable diary has since become a world classic — a powerful reminder of the horrors of war and an eloquent testament to the human spirit. In 1942, with Nazis occupying Holland, a thirteen-year-old Jewish girl and her family fled their home in Amsterdam and went into hiding. For the next two years, until their whereabouts were betrayed to the Gestapo, they and another family lived cloistered in the “Secret Annex” of an old office building. Cut off from the outside world, they faced hunger, boredom, the constant cruelties of living in confined quarters, and the ever-present threat of discovery and death. In her diary Anne Frank recorded vivid impressions of her experiences during this period. By turns thoughtful, moving, and amusing, her account offers a fascinating commentary on human courage and frailty and a compelling self-portrait of a sensitive and spirited young woman whose promise was tragically cut short.

§ § §

Selected by Indie Booksellers for the Winter 2009 
“Knucklehead is an absolute scream, detailing the misadventures of Jon Scieszka and his five brothers growing up together. There are horrible Halloween costumes, broken bones, unbelievable nicknames, pee fights, weird Cub Scout rules, socks for birthday presents, and that’s just the beginning.”
— Sarah Todd, Children’s Book World, Haverford, PA

How did Jon Scieszka get so funny, anyway? Growing up as one of six brothers was a good start, but that was just the beginning. Throw in Catholic school, lots of comic books, lazy summers at the lake with time to kill, babysitting misadventures, TV shows, jokes told at family dinner, and the result is Knucklehead. Part memoir, part scrapbook, this hilarious trip down memory lane provides a unique glimpse into the formation of a creative mind and a free spirit.

§ § §

Over the course of history men and women have lived and died. In fact, getting sick and dying can be a big, ugly mess-especially before the modern medical care that we all enjoy today. How They Croaked relays all the gory details of how nineteen world figures gave up the ghost. For example:

It is believed that Henry VIII’s remains exploded within his coffin while lying in state.
Doctors “treated” George Washington by draining almost 80 ounces of blood before he finally kicked the bucket.
Right before Beethoven wrote his last notes, doctors drilled a hole in his stomach without any pain medication.
Readers will be interested well past the final curtain, and feel lucky to live in a world with painkillers, X-rays, soap, and 911.

§     §     §

Today in class I’ll be sharing:

From Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s daughter, Dr. Bernice A. King: “My father’s dream continues to live on from generation to generation, and this beautiful and powerful illustrated edition of his world-changing “I Have a Dream” speech brings his inspiring message of freedom, equality, and peace to the youngest among us—those who will one day carry his dream forward for everyone.”

On August 28, 1963, on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington, Martin Luther King gave one of the most powerful and memorable speeches in our nation’s history. His words, paired with Caldecott Honor winner Kadir Nelson’s magnificent paintings, make for a picture book certain to be treasured by children and adults alike. The themes of equality and freedom for all are not only relevant today, 50 years later, but also provide young readers with an important introduction to our nation’s past. Included with the book is an audio CD of the speech.


About the Illustrator

KADIR NELSON is the acclaimed illustrator of Moses: When Harriet Tubman Led Her People to Freedom and Henry’s Freedom Box: A True Story from the Underground Railroad, both Caldecott Honor books. His other titles includeWe Are the Ship, a Robert F. Sibert Medal winner and Coretta Scott King Award recipient, and Heart and Soul: The Story of America and African-Americans.

BONUS VIDEO: The best-known part of the speech–