9.30 It’s Monday! What are you reading?

A new week, a new batch of books—both finished and being read. Today is…

Ring-the-Bell Monday & It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?

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This meme is originated by Jen and Kellee at TeachMentorTexts. Thanks!

{Celebrating the books we’ve read in the past week & the titles we are currently reading.}

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Ummmm… It was a busy week with getting ready for open house. I’m still reading a “fatty” and started a new book, as you will see below. I hope to Ring the Bell next week.
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What were PARENTS reading last week? Let’s check it out. (Thank you, commenters, for contributing to our book awareness.)
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[Check back throughout the day for updates of my students’ reading.]
This past week, my A Class has read:
13 books
My B Class has read:
15 books
My C Class has read:
17 books
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STILL reading this fatty…
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This was added to my Currently Reading list because I needed a book to read on my iPad at night when I wake up and can’t sleep. I love the iPad for that. Enjoying this so far.
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Some possibilities:

Before you see what the students are reading… what are you reading? Please leave a comment and let us know—and show the students that reading isn’t just a “school” thing.

(For every parent who leaves a comment with what you’re reading, I’ll give your child a BUSTED ticket…)

[Check back at the end of the day to see the cool spinning pictures of what my students are reading.]

Click the picture below for A Class SpinCam
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Click the picture below for B Class SpinCam
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Click the picture below for C Class SpinCam
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[If anyone else is using SpinCam to show what your students are reading, I’d love to know about it and link to my Friday post. Thanks.]
Thanks,
David Etkin
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9.27 {BookFlix Friday} Gidwitz does it again…Book 3 of the DARK & GRIMM series

Today is

There are tons of great book trailers out in cyberland, and each Friday I will endeavor to bring a couple to you. Many will be new and recent books. Some trailers will preview a not-yet-released book. And others will look back a little further.

Lights…Camera…Action!


Thanks to Mr. Peterson for finding the trailer for book 3 below. I’ve read the first book, but after reading the first two, Mr. P commented that this is a series that could be read out of order without missing a beat. Interesting. Do you agree?

•    •    •

AND NOW…
{If the video doesn’t show below, just click the book to go to it}
<p><a href=”http://vimeo.com/75054809″>”The Grimm Conclusion” Book Trailer</a> from <a href=”http://vimeo.com/mixtapeclub”>Mixtape Club</a> on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

{Whatever Wednesday} Happier than a camel on Wednesday

Whatever Wednesday — a chance to post something I’ve seen that I’m diggin’. Though often a cool quote or poster, it might simply be a picture.

Enjoy!… and consider posting your own Whatever.


This commercial has been playing for a few weeks at least, but my family loves it—my MOM loves it—my daughter’s classmates love it… So on Humpday, it only makes sense to pop it on here to appreciate it together.

You know, sometimes we just need to give a person a little attention and let him have his moment in the sun. There’s nothing wrong with that. How do we respond to these camels in our own lives?

 

9.23 It’s Monday! What are you reading? #OpenMic

A new week, a new batch of books—both finished and being read. Today is…

Ring-the-Bell Monday & It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?

20120117-111701.jpg 20120819-185816.jpg

This meme is originated by Jen and Kellee at TeachMentorTexts. Thanks!

{Celebrating the books we’ve read in the past week & the titles we are currently reading.}

20121202-215616.jpg

Description from IndieBound:

Using humor as the common denominator, a multicultural cast of YA authors steps up to the mic to share stories touching on race.

Listen in as ten YA authors — some familiar, some new — use their own brand of humor to share their stories about growing up between cultures. Henry Choi Lee discovers that pretending to be a tai chi master or a sought-after wiz at math wins him friends for a while — until it comically backfires. A biracial girl is amused when her dad clears seats for his family on a crowded subway in under a minute flat, simply by sitting quietly in between two uptight white women. Edited by acclaimed author and speaker Mitali Perkins, this collection of fiction and nonfiction uses a mix of styles as diverse as their authors, from laugh-out-loud funny to wry, ironic, or poingnant, in prose, poetry, and comic form.

Though some of these shorts were a little mature for my sixth graders, I’m looking forward to using a couple of them in my class as read alouds. Favorites were “Becoming Henry Lee” by David Yoo; and “Under Berlin” by G. Neri (written in verse—when I asked him on Facebook how he chose to write it that way, he said, “That’s just how the voice came to me. I can’t help it…” How cool is that?).
[Check back throughout the day for updates of my students’ reading.]
This past week, my A Class has read:
12 books
My B Class has read:
11 books
My C Class has read:
21 books
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Finally ready to wrap up this series. Man is this THICK!
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This is the prequel to Bigger than a Breadbox. I’m eagerly anticipating it (though the cover isn’t as appealing…)

Before you see what the students are reading… what are you reading? Please leave a comment and let us know—and show the students that reading isn’t just a “school” thing.

(For every parent who leaves a comment with what you’re reading, I’ll give your child a BUSTED ticket…)

[Check back at the end of the day to see the cool spinning pictures of what my students are reading.]

Click the picture below for A Class SpinCam
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Click the picture below for B Class SpinCam
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Click the picture below for C Class SpinCam
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[If anyone else is using SpinCam to show what your students are reading, I’d love to know about it and link to my Friday post. Thanks.]
Thanks,
David Etkin

9.20 {BookFlix Friday} the Middle School Series

Today is

There are tons of great book trailers out in cyberland, and each Friday I will endeavor to bring a couple to you. Many will be new and recent books. Some trailers will preview a not-yet-released book. And others will look back a little further.

Lights…Camera…Action!


Students gobble up these books like candy. I can’t blame them. Follow Rafe on his epic middle school journey.
Just who is this Rafe guy? Here:
Now, here are the books in order:
Middle School, The Worst Years of My Life
Middle School, Get Me Out of Here!
Middle School: My Brother Is a Big, Fat Liar
Middle School: How I Survived Bullies, Broccoli, and Snake Hill
Patterson has a great interactive site for his books. Check it out.

Blog Tour Stop: Deborah Hopkinson & The Great Trouble

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Today, I’m most honored to have the award-winning Ms Hopkinson visit the blog to talk a bit more about her new book The Great Trouble: A Mystery of London, the Blue Death, and a Boy Called Eel. Please scroll down to find her thoughtful response. Last week I reviewed Deborah Hopkinson’s fantastic historical fiction novel. It’s a book that is particularly interesting to me this year because of reading A Long Walk to Water with my class. (Did you miss this Nerdy Book Club post?) To make it easy for you, I’ll reprint my review right here.

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I have become a real fan of historical fiction. I’m always impressed with how authors are able to form an engrossing story around real events and times. As with much historical fiction, the history surrounding The Great Trouble is fascinating.

     In 1854 London, a cholera outbreak has hit Broad Street. There is where we meet thirteen-year-old Eel, a “Mudlark” who is scrounging alone to make a living. It’s a scene right out of Oliver Twist. When the sickness starts affecting those closest to him, Eel is determined to do something to help. He swallows his nervousness and asks his part-time employer, Dr. Snow, to help. Dr. Snow, after talking with Eel, realizes the potential the street urchin possesses and employs him to help prove once and for all that cholera is not transmitted by bad air, but by tainted water.

     This would, of course, be easier if Eel wasn’t being hunted by the mysterious (to the reader) Fisheye Bill Taylor; and if he wasn’t trying to keep a secret—a secret that required all his earnings each week.

     Hopkinson does a splendid job of bringing us to the dirty streets of London to live the life of a down-and-out boy with no one to turn to. Many of the characters—such as Dr. Snow and Rev. Whitehead—are real, as is the situation with the Broad Street pump. The fact that this “really” happened is fascinating. Hopkinson also adds realistic tension and mystery to this historical tale with the addition of Eel’s secrets and pursuers.

If Victorian England and Dickens-era stories interest you; if you are intrigued by real life science and the thought process behind scientific study of diseases, this book is for you. You may also like Hopkinson’s picture book biography on Charles Dickens,

A Boy Called Dickens

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And now, enough of me. I present to you: Ms Hopkinson!

Water – Then and Now Hopkinson2011a

I was delighted to hear that David Etkin’s students will be reading and talking about issues related to water this fall.  Here in the United States, we have come to take clean water for granted.  Reading Linda Sue Park’s A LONG WALK TO WATER will provide insight into how access to clean water shapes the lives of young people in Sudan.  And while my new book, THE GREAT TROUBLE, A Mystery of London, the Blue Death, and a Boy Called Eel, is set in the past, the issues about water-borne disease that it explores are still relevant today.

Many people haven’t heard of Dr. John Snow, but in fact he is one of the most revered physicians in history. A young friend who just graduated with a degree in public health told me recently that she learned about Dr. Snow in almost all her classes: “Dr. John Snow is the father of public health.”

John Snow conducted pioneering work in Victorian London to prove that cholera was not, as most people thought, caused by “miasma,” or bad air, but by water.  This may seem so obvious today it hardly seems worth mentioning.  But, unfortunately, while Snow’s work has gained fame and acceptance, cholera has not been erased from our world.

Just last month, researchers from the Yale Law School and Yale School of Public Health released a report analyzing the post-earthquake cholera outbreak in Haiti, which began in 2010 and has killed 8,000 people and affected 600,000 to date. Researchers can now point to conclusive evidence that poor sanitation at a Nepalese peacekeepers’ camp caused cholera bacteria to spread from troops and contaminate Haiti’s largest river. Worldwide, the World Health Organization estimates that more than 100,000 people die each year from the disease.

I chose to tell this story through historical fiction, to put readers right in the midst of the crisis and the mystery. But while THE GREAT TROUBLE is fiction, many of the details of Dr. John Snow’s 1854 work to trace the source of the Broad Street epidemic are true. I have also included almost twenty pages of back matter and resources to help students learn more.

Dr. John Snow once hoped that “the time will arrive when great outbreaks of cholera will be things of the past.”  I hope students will be inspired to follow in Dr. Snow’s footsteps and work for access to clean water for everyone.

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To see the Yale Report of August 2013: http://www.law.yale.edu/news/17237.htm

To learn more about Dr. John Snow and see his map visit the Great Trouble resources on Deborah’s website:  http://www.deborahhopkinson.com/New%20Books/trouble.html

If you didn’t catch the rest of Mr Hopkinson’s blog tour, you can go back and catch up:

September 10 – Sharp Read

September 11 – Librarian in Cute Shoes

September 12 – Random Acts of Reading

September 13 – Styling Librarian

September 14 – Kidlit Frenzy

September 15 – Busy Librarian

September 16 – {Eat the Book}

September 17 – Nerdy Book Club

9.16 It’s Monday! What are you reading? #SeeingRed

A new week, a new batch of books—both finished and being read. Today is…

Ring-the-Bell Monday & It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?

20120117-111701.jpg 20120819-185816.jpg

This meme is originated by Jen and Kellee at TeachMentorTexts. Thanks!

{Celebrating the books we’ve read in the past week & the titles we are currently reading.}

20121202-215616.jpg

I received this ARC from NetGalley. It comes out on September 24th. Keep your eyes open for a review and a visit from Ms Erskine herself:
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Some picture books as well…
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[Check back throughout the day for updates of my students’ reading.]
This past week, my A Class has read:
16 books
My B Class has read:
11 books
My C Class has read:
15 books
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Before you see what the students are reading… what are you reading? Please leave a comment and let us know—and show the students that reading isn’t just a “school” thing.

(For every parent who leaves a comment with what you’re reading, I’ll give your child a BUSTED ticket…)

[Check back at the end of the day to see the cool spinning pictures of what my students are reading.]

Click the picture below for A Class SpinCam
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Click the picture below for B Class SpinCam
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Click the picture below for C Class SpinCam
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[If anyone else is using SpinCam to show what your students are reading, I’d love to know about it and link to my Friday post. Thanks.]
Thanks,
David Etkin

9.13 {BookFlix Friday} + Reading&Tweeting + a bonus video

Today is

There are tons of great book trailers out in cyberland, and each Friday I will endeavor to bring a couple to you. Many will be new and recent books. Some trailers will preview a not-yet-released book. And others will look back a little further.

Lights…Camera…Action!


Description from IndieBound:

It takes a graveyard to raise a child.

Nobody Owens, known as Bod, is a normal boy. He would be completely normal if he didn’t live in a graveyard, being raised by ghosts, with a guardian who belongs to neither the world of the living nor the dead. There are adventures in the graveyard for a boy—an ancient Indigo Man, a gateway to the abandoned city of ghouls, the strange and terrible Sleer. But if Bod leaves the graveyard, he will be in danger from the man Jack—who has already killed Bod’s family.

Do you like being read aloud to? Here is the author reading the whole book:

Click here for the rest of the book videos, chapter by chapter. Happy Friday the 13th.

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It’s so cool Reading&Tweeting with authors. I love for my students to see that they can interact with their literary idols:

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Did you see Ben R. lugging the jerry can of water yesterday? He joined two other students trying to #CarryTheJerry around school. It helps us understand Nya and her long walk to water in our book:

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Finally, a replay of the video from Wednesday. Just too cute: